Washington’s Actions Help Start the Seven Years’ War

In December 1753, Virginia’s Royal Governor, Robert Dinwiddie, sent newly commissioned Virginia militia Major George Washington and a small party of men to ask the French to leave their settlement at The Forks of the Ohio, a place we now call Pittsburgh. The French commander – Jacques Legardeur de Saint-Pierre – read Dinwiddie’s note and politely told Washington that the French were not leaving, and Dinwiddie’s note should have been sent to the French Governor General of Canada. Without orders from his boss, Saint-Pierre would not leave.

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The Beginning of the Interstate Highway System

On March 29th, 1806, Congress passed the Cumberland Road Act, which authorized the Federal government to turn the path and wagon tract known as the Braddock Road into a real road. The road, now known as the Cumberland Road, was supposed to go from Fort Cumberland to the Mississippi River.

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England’s Country Children

What the new United States didn’t have was a stable currency, or a central bank or a strong central government, the yoke of British rule was gone. Yes, the economy was a mess, the Continental Congress was deeply in debt to its own citizens and to the Dutch, French and Spanish, all of whom paid for our independence.

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Three Times Is the Flag’s Charm

The act was passed on June 14th, 1777, which is now celebrated as Flag Day. However, the Continental Congress did not set a standard on how the stars were to be arranged. This led to all sorts of arrangements, but the most common one was a circle of 13 stars.

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The First Nine

The above list provides common characteristic three, i.e., that for the first 58 years the United States was in existence, its leaders all shared a common experience – the trial known as the American Revolution and the difficulties in founding a country that violated all the accepted precedents of the time. Many risked their lives in combat and understood that if we lost, all would have been hung as traitors by the British.

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The First Amendment Has Limits

The words in the Constitution have been open to interpretation, and the ultimate and final arbiter of any law or policy is the Supreme Court. Over the 235 years, the Supreme Court has placed very clear limits on what is and what is not “free speech, freedom of expression, and freedom to assemble.”

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Fulton’s Folly Changed Transportation and Interstate Commerce Forever

Clarmont, dubbed by some as Fulton’s Folly, was a small ship, even by the standards of the early 19th Century. It was only 142 feet long, with a beam of 18 feet, and displaced 121 tons. Clarmont was about the size of a small sailing frigate. The big difference was that it only had two small masts for sails since its four-foot wide and 15-foot diameter paddle wheels powered by a 19-horsepower steam engine built by the English firm of Boulton & Watt pushed the boat through the water.

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The Massacre That Wasn’t

While his men loaded their muskets and fixed their bayonets, Preston yelled at the crowd to disperse. His shouts were met with more insults, stones, and snowballs.

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What Were the Hessians Paid?

The troops from Hesse-Kassel and the others were known for their discipline and fighting ability. During the 17th and 18th Century, German soldiers from one principality often fought those from another.

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Our First Flag

After Lexington and Concord, and after he was made commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Washington wanted a distinctive flag that would be easily recognized and used by every unit in the Continental Army and Navy. Up until this time, the units in the Continental Army and the local militias flew the flags of their respective colony.

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