The Trade That Led to Creation of D.C.

A national capital was not a new idea. Several sites were proposed under the Articles of Confederation, and all were in either NY, NJ, or PA, something the southern states would not accept. Under the Articles of Confederation, the Continental Congress did not have the power to create a national capital, so the issue died until the new Constitution empowered the Federal government to create a home.

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England’s Country Children

What the new United States didn’t have was a stable currency, or a central bank or a strong central government, the yoke of British rule was gone. Yes, the economy was a mess, the Continental Congress was deeply in debt to its own citizens and to the Dutch, French and Spanish, all of whom paid for our independence.

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Changing of the Guard Takes Time

Between 1783 and 1795, when the Jay Treaty was signed and ratified by Congress, the U.S. was often at loggerheads with Great Britain who was routinely violating the Treaty of Paris. The Jay Treaty brought some breathing space so the Founding Fathers could figure out how to make the newly ratified Constitution work.

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Anatomy of a Privateer

Wealthy individuals or consortiums of like-minded investors would apply to their government for a letter of marque while at the same time having a vessel or vessels in mind that they would send to sea as privateers. In most cases, the ships were converted merchant men.

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Privateering During the War of 1812

Madison signed the law on August 4th, 1812, allowing consortiums to be issued letters of marque which would enable the ships they owned to seize British ships and sell the vessel and the cargo. When Congress issued a letter of marque, it did not require any sort of reporting of what they captured or sank or if the consortium’s ship was captured by the British.

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Three Times Is the Flag’s Charm

The act was passed on June 14th, 1777, which is now celebrated as Flag Day. However, the Continental Congress did not set a standard on how the stars were to be arranged. This led to all sorts of arrangements, but the most common one was a circle of 13 stars.

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Jim Blythe Veteran’s Impact Show

Marc and Jim talk about the VA diverting money from community care for veterans to providing benefits for illegal immigrants as well as more on the problems in the Middle…

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The Powerful Insurrection Act of 1807

When one realizes the Insurrection Act was written in 1807, we had been an independent country for just 24 years. The British still maintained forts on U.S. soil in the Northwest Territories and were instigating the Native Americans against the United States. They were impressing U.S. sailors into the Royal Navy and seizing our ships carrying goods to countries fighting England during the Napoleonic Wars. Our leaders felt the pressure of domestic as well as international threats. President Jefferson and Congress wanted to give the president the power to use military force if necessary to suppress a rebellion.

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Madison and Mahan

Madison had lived through two of the seven – The Seven Years War and the American Revolution – studied by Mahan. He already knew several of the precepts Mahan developed in his writings seven decades later The Thirteen Colonies and the new United States is a maritime nation. It was true before we won our independence, and it is true today.

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