Treaty of Mortefontaine’s Far-Reaching Effect

From France’s perspective, it needed to end the Quasi-War as fast as possible. In 1800, France, and its ally Spain, were embroiled in the War of the Second Coalition against England, Prussia, Russia, the Holy Roman Empire, the Ottoman Empire, and a long list of small states who wanted to restore Bourbon rule of France.

Read More

Jefferson’s Undeclared War

After the election of 1800, the Democratic-Republicans held solid majorities in both houses but refused to give Jefferson his declaration of war. Instead, Jefferson received an authorization to use force that authorized the Navy to seize Tripolitan ships and cargoes and to commission privateers.

Read More

Jim Blythe Veterans Impact Show

Marc and former Vietnam POW Dave Carey, Captain USN (retired) talk about the significance of the Declaration of Independence and how it was disseminated so everyone in the Thirteen Colonies…

Read More

President Washington’s Letter About Religious Freedom

Opponents of this position (establishing a state religion), namely Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, were vehemently opposed to a state-sponsored religion. They pointed out that state-sponsored religions often restricted citizens’ freedom to practice another religion or none at all.

Read More

The First Presidential Veto

Washington’s rationale for sending it back to Congress was that it was not a true representation of each state’s population. The original bill established the number of potential Representatives at 120 which would be divided by the 15 states, i.e. each state would receive up to eight.

Read More

Washington’s Actions Help Start the Seven Years’ War

In December 1753, Virginia’s Royal Governor, Robert Dinwiddie, sent newly commissioned Virginia militia Major George Washington and a small party of men to ask the French to leave their settlement at The Forks of the Ohio, a place we now call Pittsburgh. The French commander – Jacques Legardeur de Saint-Pierre – read Dinwiddie’s note and politely told Washington that the French were not leaving, and Dinwiddie’s note should have been sent to the French Governor General of Canada. Without orders from his boss, Saint-Pierre would not leave.

Read More

The Democratic-Republican Party Conundrum of the Election of 1808

James Madison, Jefferson’s Secretary of State, chose George Clinton, the Governor of New York, as his preferred running mate. However, both Clinton and James Monroe, then the U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Clinton also sought the top job as the Democratic-Republican Party candidate.

Read More

Madison Used Tariffs to Force the British to Change Their Trade Policies

Slowly but steadily during the the 23 years Europe was consumed by war, U.S. manufacturing grew. By 1815, 20% of the workforce in the northern states – primarily Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont – was employed by manufacturing. In the southern states – Georgia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia – only eight percent of the workers were in factories.

Read More

The Beginning of the Interstate Highway System

On March 29th, 1806, Congress passed the Cumberland Road Act, which authorized the Federal government to turn the path and wagon tract known as the Braddock Road into a real road. The road, now known as the Cumberland Road, was supposed to go from Fort Cumberland to the Mississippi River.

Read More